Dental Disease

Dental Disease

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What is Dental Disease?

Imagine what would happen if you stopped brushing your own teeth; even if you ate hard food as dogs and cats do? As a result of the convenient commercial diets and table scraps; greater than 80% of dogs and cats have periodontal disease by 5 years of age. In fact, periodontal disease is the number one disease of pets 3 years of age and older.

Periodontal disease occurs when plaque, a sticky substance consisting of food and bacteria, hardens and turns to tartar. Tartar, a sort of bacterial concrete, then inflames gums leading to gingivitis and gum recession. Tartar also builds up underneath the gum line leading to infection and loosening of the tooth root. When gingivitis and periodontal disease become severe enough, animals begin to lose teeth. In addition to tooth loss, gingivitis and periodontal disease are very painful conditions for our pets. The health implications don’t stop there. A diseased mouth also affects the kidneys, liver and heart. Inflamed gums bleed easily and anytime the gums bleed bacteria from the mouth can gain easy access to the bloodstream showering the kidney, liver and heart valves with bacteria. The constant low grade infection in these organs can lead to organ failure and death. Studies have shown that animals with gingivitis and periodontal disease live an average of 2-3 years less than pets with healthy mouths. [Read more…]

Rabies vaccine discount

Rabies vaccine discount

rabies

rabies

December special is 20% off Rabies vaccinations.

Just in time for the City’s discounted licensing in January.  City of Othello licenses are $10 for altered; $30 for unaltered animal; except in January when the prices are lowered to $6 altered; $15 unaltered.

Some people think that rabies doesn’t exist in Washington State, but that is not true.  Rabies is mandatory for all pets within the City of Othello and is also required by state law.

All warm blooded animals are vulnerable to infection with the rabies virus.  Once symptoms develop, rabies is almost always fatal.  The disease is transmitted when the virus is introduced into bite wounds, into open cuts in skin, or onto mucous membranes from saliva or other material.

Thanks to effective vaccinations, dogs are not the most common rabid domestic animal in the US.  They have been replaced by cats. The primary animals that carry rabies in the northwest United States are bats. Between 5-10% of bats submitted for testing are found to be rabid.  Unfortunately the only way to test for rabies is postmortem (after death).

The best way to help control rabies is by following the Washington Law (WAC 246-100-197) which requires all owned dogs and cats to be vaccinated by a licensed veterinarian.

Per the state law if unvaccinated dogs, cats and ferrets come into contact with a suspected rabid animal they are (i) Euthanized immediately; or (ii) Confined in a manner considered appropriate by the local health officer for at least six months from the date of suspected rabies exposure and given rabies vaccine at least thirty days prior to the end of the confinement period.

 If your animal is current on their vaccine they can be revaccinated immediately with rabies vaccine, kept under the owner’s control in a manner considered appropriate by the local health officer, and observed for forty-five days for signs of illness.